4 Endangered Species in New Zealand

The consequences of global pollution and the appropriation of wildlife territory has had serious repercussions in nature. Our negative ecological footprint is threatening more and more species of wildlife and there is no denying that reality. If you want to know about New Zealand’s endangered species, stick around.

A Tiny Bird Called Fairy Tern

Featured image 4 Endangered Species in New Zealand A Tiny Bird Called Fairy Tern - 4 Endangered Species in New Zealand

This species was near the front being eradicated back in 1983, as their population reached an all-time low of 10 specimens.

The main cause of their demise was the loss of habit and that they were prey to animals introduced by men like rats, cats, and even dogs. Nowadays, their numbers are up to 40, but the situation remains critical.

The Kakapo

Featured image 4 Endangered Species in New Zealand The Kakapo - 4 Endangered Species in New Zealand

This is a bird which doesn’t fly because it never had to due to the lack of predators present in their habitat. However, the situation changed when men introduced species that shouldn’t be there in the first place such as cats, rats, and stoats.

Their number right now is around 124 individuals and they can only be found in bird sanctuaries.

The Beautiful White Heron

Featured image 4 Endangered Species in New Zealand The Beautiful White Heron - 4 Endangered Species in New Zealand

This is a really sad story about a bird which was too good looking for its benefit and was hunted almost to extinction by humans. Their beautiful feathers used to be present in ornaments for the people of the Maori and Pakeha tribes.

They were almost eliminated completely as there are only 100-140 specimens today.

The Maui’s Dolphin

Featured image 4 Endangered Species in New Zealand The Mauis Dolphin - 4 Endangered Species in New Zealand

This is another victim of humans which has only 55 specimens in the wild and desperately needs to recover. These creatures die in fishing nets. Therefore, the use of those had been banished.

The main threat to Maui’s dolphin is fishing. Hence, it should recover completely if left alone.

We need to take serious actions to avoid the catastrophic effect our reckless behaviour can have. Taking responsibility is about making the right moves to correct the negative impact of our previous decisions.